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Dr. Redinger's SPS April Progress Report

In her April Progress Report, Spokane Public School Superintendent, Dr. Shelley Redinger, explains what a portfolio school district is, and talks about how SPS is expanding learning options for families.

Our Kids are Our Business

Our Kids are Our Business

April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month.  Eight years ago the Spokane community decided enough was enough!  It was rocked to the core by the horrific death of little Summer Phelps and was jarred into taking a stand for children.

KXLY has joined with 34 other businesses and individuals (Spo-Can Council) for the month-long initiative "Our Kids Our Business". The focus is on the prevention of child abuse and neglect. The council holds regular meetings, and next week will hold it's annual luncheon.  

Help for parents with autistic kids increasing in Spokane

Help for parents with autistic kids increasing in Spokane

The number of children diagnosed with autism has jumped 30-percent since 2012, according to a new report from the CDC, and there are 2,000 children in Spokane County who have been diagnosed with autism, which is only second to King County.

New legislation was passed in 2013 to make treatment for these children more accessible, but there is still an issue of supply and demand.

Charles Green's 4-year-old son Noah was diagnosed with autism last October.

"He has a great personality, great sense of humor, great kid," Green said.

For Green, getting the diagnosis, "in some ways it was a relief because we could finally get him the help he needed."

Noah is part of a new program offered by the Northwest Autism Center. The program focuses on children ages two to five years old and provides them with extensive care for 12 weeks.

"This particular approach allows us to really get to know the child and build a transitional plan that will positively impact the services they are going to receive where ever they are going next," Dawn Sidell with the Northwest Autism Center said.

Orientation meeting for families interested in SPRINT

Orientation meeting for families interested in SPRINT

From Spokane Public Schools:


Interested families are invited to learn more about one of Spokane Public Schools’ alternative learning options, the SPRINT program.

Spokane schools could see longer days as soon as this fall

Spokane schools could see longer days as soon as this fall

Washington state is requiring longer school days for the 2015-2016 school year, but Spokane Public Schools is considering making the change as soon as this fall.

The new schedule will mean up to an additional 30 minutes of school depending on the grade.

"The board mandated that the administration do it, the administration has been in this negotiation for that extended day," Kevin Morrison, director of community resources for Spokane Public Schools, said.

Morrison said part of the process is receiving feedback on whether or not the change should be implemented a year early.

"I think over a thousand responses and it's pretty close to 50-50," he said.

Spokane's school day is on the shorter side compared to others in the state and nation and the change would adjust that, adding 30 minutes to the elementary school day and six minutes to the high school and middle school day.

The district's hope is that more time for instruction would mean increased student achievement. However, some parents like Amber Rushing think otherwise, saying that's too much time for a nine-year-old to sit still.

Local charity needs help winning $25K Charity Challenge

Local charity needs help winning $25K Charity Challenge

Family Promise of Spokane has been serving homeless families for 17 years, and now, with a huge opportunity on the line, they need your vote. The non-profit has been selected as a regional finalist for the Windermere Foundation’s Charity Challenge, and for Family Promise the $25,000 prize would be nothing short of a miracle.


“This is a huge opportunity for us,” said Family Promise Executive Director Steve Allen. “A game changer.”

Report shows high rate of tobacco sales to WA minors

Report shows high rate of tobacco sales to WA minors

The number of retailers in Washington that illegally sell tobacco to minors is high for the second year in a row. An annual report that tracks illegal sales shows about 15% of tobacco retailers sold tobacco to minors in 2013, which is about the same as it was in 2012. As recently as 2009, the rate was much lower, at about 9%.