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Group Health changes name to Group Hawks

Group Health changes name to Group Hawks

Group Health announced Wednesday that it is changing its corporate name to Group Hawks to show support for the Seattle Seahawks as they prepare to battle the Patriots in the Super Bowl. The name change was announced Wednesday, and will continue through Sunday’s big game.

 

“Patients still can find the quality and affordable healthcare they’ve always experienced at Group Health, but at Group Hawks they’ll also find plenty of Seahawks fever,” said Scott Armstrong, Group Hawks CEO. “And Seahawks fever is a condition we have tested, and know from our evidence-based medicine approach, can have very positive patient outcomes.”

 

Medical experts at Group Hawks say these are the Seahawks fever symptoms to watch for:

  • Green and blue face paint
  • Irresistible urge to have the #12 prominently tattooed on limbs, face or other obvious body parts
  • A need to wear feathers
  • Sudden urges to yell “Go Hawks!”

 

Spokane Eye Clinic accepting used eye wear donations for a cause

Spokane Eye Clinic accepting used eye wear donations for a cause

Do you have old eye glasses laying around collecting dust? The Spokane Eye Clinic is accepting used eye wear donations now through February 6th at any of their three area locations.

 

Allyssa Kuprienko, a Certified Ophthalmic Assistant to Dr. Randall Jacobson, is leaving for Jamaica at the end of February for a brief volunteer trip with Volunteer Optometrists Service to Humanity (VOSH). Prior to her trip, she hopes to collect as many used glasses as she can for Jamaicans in need.

 

VOSH is an organizations that travels throughout the developing world and U.S. with qualified volunteers. These volunteers provide free quality vision care services through short-term clinics. They also work to develop sustainable programs and local optometric care in the developing world in order to help local communities provide quality vision care.

 

Another January start to good health...healthy heart

Another January start to good health...healthy heart
The Workout...  The first two weeks have been better than I thought possible. Although 30 pounds heavier than my heart attack weight, my stamina is better than at any other time in the last 10 years.  The not smoking and walking everyday has paid off. Gaining that much weight proves my "one meal a day habit" is cured.  More intake needed to fuel the body also means more movement is needed to keep off the weight. My efforts to balance that have failed. Snacks and more meat and potatoes than needed have been half the problem, cardio exercise or lack of, is the other half.  The body is a machine according to Dr Keith Kadel, Cardiologist, and it needs to be used, revved up and put through the paces. We need to put blood through the heart and get it to all areas of the body.   The heart beats 100,000 times a day and if it can beat a little slower it runs more efficiently.

INBC reaches safe levels of O-negative and O-positive blood

INBC reaches safe levels of O-negative and O-positive blood

The Inland Northwest Blood Center announced good news on Thursday regarding the levels of O-negative and O-positive blood. The only supplier of blood for area hospitals reported that the supply of these types of blood has reached safe levels.  INBC said that thanks to the donors who have rolled up their sleeve to give blood, they have seen nearly 500 type O donors since Monday. This is a huge response that has brought the blood supply up a remarkable 90% in the last few days.

INBC reminded donors the need for blood does not go on vacation. They urge donors who have made an appointment to keep them in order to ensure blood supply remains at needed levels. INBC needs 200 donors every day, with nearly 90 of those being type O.

Flu activity continues to rise in Spokane County

Flu activity continues to rise in Spokane County

The Flu claimed the life of a Spokane County adult this week—eastern Washington’s second flu-related death this season. The male resident was in his 60s.


"Sadly, this is an example of how serious flu can be," said Dr. Joel McCullough, Spokane Regional Health District’s health officer. “Your best chance at protecting your loved ones, and yourself, from flu is to get a flu shot.”


The flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by viruses that infect the nose, throat and lungs. Flu vaccines are designed to protect against the main flu viruses that research suggests will be the most common during the upcoming season. Three kinds of flu viruses commonly circulate among people today: influenza A (H1N1) viruses, influenza A (H3N2) viruses, and influenza B viruses.


According to the Washington State Department of Health (DOH), so far this year, the dominant flu virus has been H3N2, and of the tested samples, about half have drifted slightly away from the vaccine formula. This is the same trend seen nationally.

 

Spokane agencies partner to issue cold weather health advisory

Spokane agencies partner to issue cold weather health advisory

With the coldest weather of the winter season so far expected today through Wednesday, Spokane Regional Health District (SRHD), City of Spokane and Spokane County are issuing this health advisory to warn the community about the dangers of exposure to cold conditions. Exposure to cold temperatures can cause serious or life-threatening health problems. Infants and the elderly are particularly at risk, but anyone, including animals, can be affected.

 

INBC at emergency levels of Type O negative and Type O positive blood

INBC at emergency levels of Type O negative and Type O positive blood

The Inland Northwest Blood Center (INBC) is calling all eligible O-Negative and O-Positive blood donors to roll up their sleeve and give blood as soon as possible.

INBC says blood supply has reached critical levels for O blood types, with only 10% of needed blood supply on the shelf. In order to reach a safe blood supply, over 500 blood donors are urgently needed this week.

O-Negative blood is the universal blood type and can be given to anyone in an emergency situations where there is not enough time to match a patient’s blood type. O-Positive is the most common blood type and so is crucial to have a safe supply on hospital shelves. INBC is the only supplier of blood to area hospitals and needs an average of 200 blood donors every day.

In response to the critical levels, INBC is opening its Spokane Center on Thursday, January 1st from 7:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Appointments are encouraged, but walk-ins are needed at this time. Donation centers can be found in Spokane, Coeur d’Alene, Lewiston and the Valley Hospital. For more information, visit www.inbcsaves.org.