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Local comedian Michael Glatzmaier combines comedy and song for May 7 show a the Bing

Local comedian Michael Glatzmaier combines comedy and song for May 7 show a the Bing

 

Song and comedy will collide during a special performance at the Bing Crosby Theater on May 7th at 7:30 p.m.

 

Local comedian Michael Glatzmaier began playing guitar when he was 8 years old. While most children would dream of becoming rock stars, Glatzmaier had something different in mind.

 

“I was never into country music, I was never into rock n' roll, and definitely was not a rapper or anything,” Glatzmaier said. “People would come up to me and they would say, 'Michael, make a song about my friend,' 'Michael, make a song about the P.E. Teacher,' 'Make a song about the lunch food,' and right away I would start making up a song and they would always be goofy. I guess it was just fun to make people laugh or smile.”

 

Piano star and YouTube sensation Valentina Lisitsa to perform with Symphony

Piano star and YouTube sensation Valentina Lisitsa to perform with Symphony

 

Valentina Lisitsa, the piano superstar famous worldwide for launching her career via social media, will perform with the Spokane Symphony on Saturday April 18 at 8:00 p.m. and again on Sunday April 19 at 3:00 p.m. at the Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox. The Ukrainian-born American will play Rachmaninoff's Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini with the Symphony.

 

Lisitsa describes herself as "just another blonde female Russian pianist," but has been dubbed by others as "the Justin Bieber of the classical world". In 2007 she was living in North Carolina with her toddler son, and just about ready to five up on her music career. A decision to post her performances on YouTube became a turning point in her career.

 

In the span of 5 years, Lisitsa had gone from nearly quitting the business to becoming one of the internet's most watched classical musicians. Her YouTube channel has captivated a reported 45 million visitors.

 

Gonzaga University lecture to bust myths surrounding Native American people and culture

Gonzaga University lecture to bust myths surrounding Native American people and culture

 

A lecture exploring the myths surrounding Native American people and culture will take place at Gonzaga University.

 

The lecture is a part of Gonzaga's 2015 History Department Art and Craft of History Lecture, and will be given by Laurie Arnold, Gonzaga's Director of Native American Studies. The event will take place on April 8th at 5:30 p.m. in Wolff Auditorium.

 

Arnold's discussion, entitled "Mythbusting! Native American History and Contemporary Issues," will present an opportunity for the community to gather and discuss why myths about the Native American culture are not only untrue, but are harmful to Native peoples and the broader American public.

 

Arnold used the common myth of "Indians have special rights" as an example of some of the topics open for discussion during the lecture.

 

"These myths perpetuate misunderstandings in the same way that people who 'play' Indian, by wearing dime-store feathered headdresses or by falsely claiming Native American heritage, perpetuate objectification and appropriation of Native cultures," she said.

 

Cellist Zuill Bailey kicks off series of free performances for Northwest Bach Festival

 

 

Cellist Zuill Bailey kicked off a series of 6 free Flash-Bach concerts on Wednesday with a noon performance in the Riverpark Square Atrium.

 

These flash performances are organized to make classical music more accessible to various people in different locations.

 

“I think that concerts are one thing. Those are people that know to go, they know the beauty of the music, they prepare themselves to go. But I really feel the need to bring music to people that may not know,” Bailey said. “It's basically bringing music to the people, in any way that I possibly can outside the concert hall.”

Local artist Keike von Holt to present at Barton School Feb. 18

Local artist Keike von Holt to present at Barton School Feb. 18

Artist Keike von Holt will address Barton School students and teachers on Wednesday, February 18, 2015 at 10:30 a.m. at First Presbyterian Church.   

Her presentation will mark the 46th birthday of the all volunteer adult literacy program. She will show and discuss her art and her experiences as a newcomer to this country.  

Von Holt grew up in Tokyo, Japan where she met and married her husband Neil Von Holt, then a student at Sophia University.  They came to Spokane in 1958 where Neil returned to studies at Gonzaga University.

Heike’s art falls into three genres: Japanese Calligraphy, Sumi-e (Japanese ink painting) and Western-style drawing and watercolor.  Subjects include abstracts, florals, portraits, animals,  landscapes, or anything that inspires her. 

Interested in calligraphy from the time she entered school, her pursuit of it as an art form came in 1974 during the World’s Fair in Spokane, when the Japanese Pavilion featured a demonstration of Sumi-e by Fumiko kimura. Keiko saw this as an enhancement of the calligraphy she already loved.

Local robotics team prove Girl Scouts go beyond cookies

Local robotics team prove Girl Scouts go beyond cookies

For most, the Girl Scouts are associated with one thing- cookies. However in addition to selling cookies, many Girl Scouts are dedicating hours of their time to something else- engineering.

 

Six girls make up the Rambunctious Robot Dancers, a local Girl Scouts robotics team whose members spend several hours each week programming an autonomous robot for FIRST Lego League (FLL) competitions.