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Republicans of Spokane County to meet to discuss gun control, other key issues

Republicans of Spokane County to meet to discuss gun control, other key issues

 

The Republicans of Spokane County announced they will be meeting after the weekend to discuss key issues.

Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich will speak about gun control “addressing the proposed gun legislation and other relevant issues.”

Dick Leland, deputy for Cathy McMorris Rodgers, will speak about the fiscal cliff negotiations.

Michael Cathcart, director of government affairs at Spokane Home Builders Association, will discuss Proposition 2, which will appear on February's ballot. Prop 2 regards a “taxpayer protection policy at the city level.” A “yes” vote would mean that a supermajority of city council votes would be necessary to raise taxes.

The group will be meeting Monday, Jan. 21 at the Quality Inn I-90 and Argonne.

3.3 million voters' pamphlets in the mail

3.3 million voters' pamphlets in the mail

About 3.3 million voters' pamphlets will arrive to households across the state this week.

According to the Assosicated Press, the secretary of state's office says the pamphlets are being delivered around the same time voters are receiving their ballots for next month's election.

There are 26 editions of the pamphlet to account for races in different counties, plus pamphlets in Spanish, Chinese and Vietnamese. The biggest pamphlets are more than 240 pages.

The pamphlets include information on races for president, governor, Congress, the state Supreme Court and Legislature as well as ballot measures concerning legalizing marijuana, same-sex marriage and authorizing charter schools.

McMorris Rodgers hosting Spokane town hall meeting

Representative Cathy McMorris Rodgers will be in the Spokane area and she wants to hear from the public. 

According to a spokesman for Rep. McMorris Rodgers,  the Congresswoman will be continuing her tour of town hall meetings by hosting a meeting Spokane on Thursday.

The meeting will give citizens a changes to express their opinion on critical issues including jobs, government spending, health care, energy and national security with the Congresswoman. 

The town hall will be at The Lincoln Center located at 1316 N. Lincoln, starting at 6 p.m.

This is just one of many town hall meeting Rep. McMorris Rodgers has done in Eastern Washington. She has hosted open forums in Dayton, Walla Walla, Newport and Republic.

Elections office hoping for more ballot returns

It’s primary-eve in Spokane County and ballot returns are still low. About 23% of registered voters have returned their ballots, but that’s still a bit slow since tomorrow is election day. In the past two years they’ve seen between 26-42% voter turnout.

Voter turnout in legislative district four was leading for awhile, but now district six leads in that department. Overall, voters in Fire District 9 have returned the most percentage of ballots out of anybody.

Spokane County Auditor Vicki Dalton says voter turnout tends to pick up when there’s an interesting election race happening. Current events will push people to get their ballots in early.

Dalton added that they’re getting a couple calls into the elections office from voters asking for information about candidates. Since a voters guide is not printed during the primary to save on costs, they have to direct people to an online version.

If you haven’t already, turn in that ballot. You can drop it off at any library with a drop box until 8 p.m. on Tuesday.

Voter turnout low in Spokane County

With less than a week away from the August primary election, Spokane County is nowhere close to the average voter turnout expected. Only 16.33% of voters have turned in their ballots.

The average turnout for the past five years, which includes one presidential election, is 36%, but at this point, voters are nowhere close to reaching that average. This doesn’t mean voter turnout won’t average out in the next couple of days.

This is actually the earliest August primary ever because Secretary of State Sam Reed requested the earlier date to accommodate military and overseas voters. New state laws also require ballots go out to registered voters 45 days before an election.

Reed calls this primary a watershed election year which means the results from this year’s election will decide the state’s politics for years to come.

Here’s today’s voter turnout statistics provided by Spokane County Elections Office:

8.61% of registered Spokane County voters have returned ballots

More primary ballots are arriving to the Spokane County Elections Office. Since Wednesday, another 4,400 ballots have been checked in, but that’s only 8.61% of registered voters in the county.

Be careful where you drop your ballot off though. Many libraries have drop boxes installed on their premises, but many miss those devices and instead drop them in the book return. It takes two library staff members to escort the ballot back out to the drop box - kind of like the buddy system to confirm the validity of the ballot.

Spokane Public Libraries says it’s sometimes happens at their downtown location during the election season, but the Shadle Library sees this happen about twice a week.

And be careful not to drop your checked out library items into the ballot boxes. Spokane Public Libraries warns on Facebook that the elections office may not return your items as quickly as you’d like.

Here’s today’s election statistics for Spokane County. Voters in the 4th Legislative District and the Spokane Valley Fire District continue to lead with ballot returns. You have until August 7.

6.97% of registered Spokane County voters have returned ballots

Almost two weeks remain until the voter deadline for this year’s primary election. This year’s primary on August 7th decides the final two candidates for positions like county commissioner, state representatives, state and U.S. senate.

Since ballots were dropped in late June (for military overseas) and early July (for Spokane County residents), 18,800 voters have already returned their ballots. For Spokane County, that’s only 6.97% of registered voters.

If you haven’t already filled out your ballot, check your mailbox and make sure you received it. The elections office can replace your ballot if you need a new one.

To return your ballot, either stamp on some postage and throw it in your outgoing mail or take it to the nearest library with a drop box.