Our network

Schools

WSU regents approve bond sale for health clinic, more residencies

WSU regents approve bond sale for health clinic, more residencies

To help overcome the physician shortage in central and eastern Washington, the Washington State University Board of Regents, at its September meeting, approved the sale of up to $16.25 million in revenue bonds for design and construction of the University district Health Clinic.

The clinic will be part of the Spokane Teaching Health Center consortium of Empire Health Foundation, Providence Health Care and WSU Spokane, which was established in November.

The consortium uses federal teaching health center funds to increase the number of physician residencies. Six additional residency slots are already available in Spokane because of the consortium's efforts.

Residents are newly graduated medical doctors who must complete at least three years of graduate education in an accredited physician training program before they can apply for board certification in a specialty.

Controversy continues over proposed WSU medical school

Controversy continues over proposed WSU medical school

 The University of Washington released a scathing rebuttal this week to a report supporting the creation of a medical school for Washington State University, saying it contains “a number of deep flaws,” and is based on “faulty assumptions, omissions and erroneous data.”

WSU first approached consultant MGT of America in February to conduct a feasibility assessment for a new medical school based on the University's health sciences campus in Spokane. Specifically the assessment was to focus on the need for physicians in Eastern Washington, the best educational model to meet those needs, if current WSU resources were capable of creating a program to meet accreditation standards and the required time and resources to develop a new medical school.

Fire safety reminder for dormitory living

Fire safety reminder for dormitory living

Dorms are filling up fast around Washington State as students begin or continue their college education, and the state Fire Marshal wants to make sure everyone has a safe school year.

“Fire safety should be reviewed as students settle into their new places,” said State Fire Marshal Chuck Duffy. “Understanding the safety features of a building and knowing your escape routes can significantly increase your personal safety.”

The United States Fire Administration reports an estimated 3,800 university housing fires occur each year. The leading causes include cooking, intentionally set fires, careless smoking, unattended candles and overloaded electrical wiring. Marshal Duffy suggests the following tips to reduce the risk of fire and increase safety:

Cooking should only be done in a location permitted by the school’s policies. Never leave your cooking unattended. If a fire starts in a microwave, leave the door closed and unplug the unit.

Check your child's vaccinations before heading back to school

Check your child's vaccinations before heading back to school

Getting ready for back to school means getting school supplies and backpacks, but it's also the perfect time to make sure children are up-to-date on their shots. Getting all of the recommended shots is one of the most important things parents can do to protect their kids' health.

A new survey from the Washington State Department of Health shows vaccination rates are on the rise (71 percent in 2013 versus 65 percent the year before) but are still below the Healthy People 2020 goal of 80 percent, leaving many kids unprotected.

Below is a summary of shots children need:

Spokane salon sending kids back to school in style

Spokane salon sending kids back to school in style

A Spokane salon is helping send kids from McDonald Elementary back to school in style with free haircuts this Friday, August 29.

“It's important to me and the team at dept. Z to give back to our community,” said owner Zoe Boysen. “Everyone should feel fresh and confident after a haircut, and we want to help students from McDonald Elementary feel that way when they return to the classroom next week. The last thing a child needs on the first day of school is a bad hair day.”

The 24 appointment slots filled quickly, but Boysen says she and her stylists will take as many kids as time allows.

“We may not be able to supply all these kids with food and clothing but we can definitely give them a really great haircut,” said senior dept. Z stylist Mateo Balmes. “When you look good you feel good and that's so important for your first day at school. I thought by providing students with a free cut and style, we could get them off to a great start for the new school year.”

WSU student planners feature rival school on cover

WSU student planners feature rival school on cover

Students at Washington State University did a double-take when they received their free student planners from The Bookie this week. The cover features a picture of a cougar, the iconic Bryan clock tower and a building that was a little harder to identify.

Down at the very bottom of the cover, with beautiful brick and elegant cherry trees is Savery Hall, a building located at the heart of the campus of WSU's sworn rival – the University of Washington.

Distraught manager Leslie Martin at WSU's bookstore The Bookie says they are aware of the problem and are working with the vendor to come to a solution. The planners are no longer being handed out, but the ones that have been released are not being collected.

There is no word on whether the school will receive a refund or whether a reprint with a corrected cover is in the works. Meanwhile, a photo of the planner is quickly making the rounds online drawing amusement and criticism.

EWU sending financial aid counselors to students in Carlton Complex fire

EWU sending financial aid counselors to students in Carlton Complex fire

In an effort to help students and their families impacted by the Cartlton Complex fires, Eastern Washington University will send a team of financial aid counselors and outreach staff to Okanogan County to assist those who are planning to attend Eastern this fall.

The financial aid and outreach team will be in Okanogan County the week of August 11 to meet with students and their families. As the date approaches, details on the exact location and times will be announced and posted on the university website and Facebook page.

Eastern has also authorized $250,000 of aid for an EWU Student Hardship Fund to help with tuition and housing for current and incoming students.

EWU Vice President for Student Affairs Stacey Morgan Foster said financial aid counselors will have the authority to award hardship grants during their visit. The grants are also available to EWU students outside of the Carlton Complex fire area.