Our network

Weather

City of Spokane declares the end of the Stage 1 snow event

City of Spokane declares the end of the Stage 1 snow event

The City of Spokane said that the completion of plowing on residential hill routes ended the Stage 1 snow event on Tuesday. The snow event was declared Sunday afternoon.

 

City crews began working Friday to prepare streets ahead of the Sunday storm. As the snowfall intensity increased, additional crews were called in to prepare the city for the Monday morning commute. Spokane has more than 2,100 lane miles, including 760 arterial lane miles.

 

Snow emergency routes, major arterials, hills and transit routes were the initial focus. Resources were added to the residential hill routes as part of the Stage 1 snow event. The snow “boot” attached to a grader was also tested as part of the pilot program.

 

According to the City, a Stage 1 snow event occurs when two inches of snow are on the ground, and four inches or more are anticipated during the current snow event. This declaration triggers a number of actions.

 

These actions include:

Spokane agencies partner to issue cold weather health advisory

Spokane agencies partner to issue cold weather health advisory

With the coldest weather of the winter season so far expected today through Wednesday, Spokane Regional Health District (SRHD), City of Spokane and Spokane County are issuing this health advisory to warn the community about the dangers of exposure to cold conditions. Exposure to cold temperatures can cause serious or life-threatening health problems. Infants and the elderly are particularly at risk, but anyone, including animals, can be affected.

 

How Spokane Public Schools determine when to delay/close due to winter weather

Spokane Public Schools Superintendent Dr. Shelley Redinger details how the district deals with winter weather delays and school closures, and takes a look at the upcoming bond and levy.

Learn more at www.spokaneschools.org.

Avista Energy Fair next Thursday

Avista Energy Fair next Thursday

Avista is inviting the public to come learn about free energy-saving materials and meet with community partners at their Energy Fair next Thursday, September 25.

From 3-6 pm at the Northeast Community Center (4001 N. Cook) in Spokane, area residents will learn about energy efficiency, managing their home energy bills and more. The event includes demonstrations and free energy-saving materials to help keep your home comfortable and safe for the winter ahead.

“Each year our customers ask for help in managing their energy use and costs during the winter. It's never too early in the year for us to offer a broad range of ideas and demonstrations that will help residents keep the warm air inside and the cold air outside their homes,” said Ana Matthews, Avista's consumer affairs program manager. “This event provides a great way for customers to conveniently access Avista's many services. Information about payment options, energy assistance and energy efficiency will be especially helpful for those struggling to pay their bills.”

DNR bans all outdoor burning

DNR bans all outdoor burning

The Washington Department of Natural Resources has expanded the current statewide burn ban to cover all outdoor burning on DNR-protected lands, with no exceptions.

“All indicators are that we'll continue to have high heat, low humidity and storm systems with winds and lightning. That means huge potential for wildfires,” said Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark. “We need to do everything we can to minimize danger to people, homes and habitat.”

Hot and dry conditions since early summer have caused very high fire hazard conditions throughout the state. These conditions have caused fires to spread rapidly and challenged firefighting efforts. More than $91 million has been spent so far battling wildfires in 2014, and more than 350,000 acres have burned across the state. There are many weeks to go in this year’s fire season, which usually runs into October.

Free storm debris disposal ends Sunday

Free storm debris disposal ends Sunday

The city's free green storm debris disposal program is ending Sunday after receiving more than 85 tons at two transfer stations.

Nearly 350 people have dropped off tree branches and other debris after last Saturday's storm moved through the area. Normally the cost for disposal is $5 for up to 220 pounds of material. The service does not include logs, roofing, vinyl fencing or similar materials, and is only available to individuals – not commercial landscaping or yard care businesses.

Small amounts of green debris can also be placed in personal green yard waste carts.

Yard debris will be accepted through Sunday from 7:30 am to 5 pm at the following facilities:

  • North County Transfer Station, 22123 N. Elk-Chattaroy Road
  • Waste to Energy Facility, 2900 S Geiger Blvd.

Avista recap and thanks for Saturday storm

Avista recap and thanks for Saturday storm

Avista once again is expressing their gratefulness for customer patience and support after recovering from the second major storm in just two weeks.

It took only three days to restore power to all 48,000 customers impacted by the August 2 storm, which rolled across the inland northwest just six days after the July 23 storm. The last storm resulted in the worst damage to the system since an ice storm in 1996.

“It's an amazing achievement to restore power to all of our customers within a matter of days following the one-two punch we received from Mother Nature,” said Avista Utilities President Dennis Vermillion. “Given the magnitude of damage from these back-to-back storms, I have the deepest respect for all of our employees who were involved in restoration efforts, especially our Avista crews and the contract crews who worked tirelessly in the heat to turn on the lights and get the air conditioning and fans blowing for our customers.”